Good Grief People. (Death. The uninvited intruder).

Good Grief People, a deeply moving collection of stories and poems written by Glynis M. Belec; Barbara Heagy; Alan Anderson; Donna Mann; Ruth Smith Meyer and Carolyn Wilker.

DEATH!  The uninvited intruder that robs us of joy in life.

It interrupts your life and slows your plans and goals.  (Donna Mann, page 92 in the book)

This is a book that could claim to be a comforter to all who lose a loved one.  It is that and more.  It is like a comforting hug; an understanding friend.  Within the many experiences I feel there will be at least one with which you can relate, if you have experienced a death in your family, or social circle.

They are stories that could help you deal with the deep trauma of grief, and not be trapped by it.

When we come to accept that death is a part of life.  We can’t escape it, but we can overcome the pain of grief.

Ruth M Belec says it well on page 72. Grief!  We don’t get over it.  Rather, it becomes part of us.  We slowly develop a new normal.

This a profoundly true.  One day at a time, you do what needs to be done.  The hardest part is just getting out of bed, when you would prefer to curl up in a ball and die too.

Death not only robs you of a loved one; it steals your identity.  Suddenly, you are no longer a parent, son, daughter, friend.  Life becomes empty: an empty chair at the table.  Birthdays, anniversaries and special holidays are tinged with sadness.  There are a multitude of new ‘firsts’ as you attempt to regain a normalcy in life.

Barbara Heagy writes, ‘I have learned that grief doesn’t come in nice tidy stages.  It has a twisting path that goes ina and out of healing and new growth, and back into emotional outbursts, anger, and panic.  I may think I am doing just fine and then something will happen that makes me realize I really am not as fine as I thought. (Page 139)

Altogether, a down-to-earth look at, and sharing of death, and the ensuing grief.

Easy to read when you feel you can begin to look at the outside world of life again.

May be purchased on Amazon.ca

https://www.amazon.ca/review/RX9BZWZ729K9V

 

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Surviving ‘Uncle Hitler’ – Book Review

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Surviving ‘Uncle Hitler’  Journey of a German Girl written by Dorothea Wollin Null is a thoroughly engrossing account of the life of six year old Dorothea, caught up in the atrocities of  war in Europe.

Under the brutal Hitler regime the German people were hoodwinked into thinking the bombing of German has been unprovoked.  They believed their country was innocent of evil activities and was being led by a leader of esteem.  This was before television reporters could investigate to reveal the truth.

When her family lost their home they began a long, dangerous journey seeking shelter wherever they could.  This journey took them through the Hitler reign, the Russian occupation and so much more.

The strength they needed was beyond their ability.  Their Christian faith sustained them through extreme conditions lasting for decades.

Dorothea’s account is beautifully compelling and sad.  War is especially cruel to children who have no real concept of why people are suddenly so cruel and lacking compassion toward neighbours who are in trouble.

Emotions are turned upside down and surviving to hold their family together became the mainstay of her parents and siblings.

Finally landing in America, her story will hold your attention from beginning to end.

I can relate to much of what she recalls having survived bomb attacks through the German blitz on England and being relocated out of London during second world war in England.  None of what I experienced compares with the trials Dorothea and her family endured.  This honest critique from the memories of a little girl is definitely a must-read.

Highly recommended for all.

I was provided with a complimentary copy of this publication in exchange for an honest review.

https://www.amazon.ca/review/RJ6BAD1KSB755

Death Defied, Life Defined – Review

Death Defied, Life Defined, A Miracle Man’s Memoir by Paul E. Perkins, is a compelling story of Paul’s constant battle against heart failure.

While waiting for a transplant, he shares the trials and tribulations of the accompanying health, and emotional issues involved.

What becomes paramount, when the waiting becomes too much, is the sheer determination to not give up.

Through surgery after surgery, relapse after relapse, he outlines the struggles he valiantly chose to not succumb to. His weary body came close to giving up the fight until the moments when he died.  These out-of-body experiences are described in detail, to the point of making the reader envious of the ‘journeys’ he travelled.  They give credence to other reports of heavenly visits, and of messages of hope that the recipients are charged with sharing on their return to the earthly realm.

He gives dramatic detail of medical teams, family and friends support, all so vital in providing him with the will to continue the painful, harrowing months of waiting for much-needed organ transplants that become his only option to death.

There is much in-depth detail in this story.  Paul gives greater power to his death experiences with the infinitely elaborate accounts of events leading up to each occurrence.  His obvious respect for the medical teams on whose care his very life depended is obvious. 

A book that cannot be ignored.  A story to make you think beyond your own limitations.  A tale of hope, and love, and the deep will to live.

I found it fascinating, captivating, exhausting, as I took on the weariness of his fight to survive.  His overwhelming determination to overcome provided me with much food for thought, and the out-of-body episodes enthralling – I could understand his yearning to just go.

His tremendous fighting spirit left me battle-weary, but hopeful of better things to come, proven as being credible, once again.

Well worth reading.

Patricia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thankful – Day Three

Hello Again

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I got really busy yesterday and did not post my third day of things I am thankful for: so here goes.  I just finished having lunch, sitting in my garden and realized I was delinquent in my commitment to share.

I am thankful for friends, old and new.  Part of yesterday, I spent time with a bunch of truly amazing ladies from my church.  We call ourselves the Creative Connection (some call us the Crafty Connection).  We share skills, or teach newcomers how to knit, crochet, sew, quilt plus any new idea that can be added.

I am knitting Barbie clothes for my grand-daughter’s dolls.  Tiny, yes, but quickly and easily completed.  I want to learn to crochet and begin sewing once more.  I have neglected so many crafts but am now being inspired to bring them back out into the light of day.  IMG_4465IMG_4467

 

 

 

 

I am thankful for the opportunity and the energy to come alongside a dear friend dealing with the recent death of her husband.  Her grief tears my heart, but if I can help her in any small ways, I feel that I am supporting her.

I am thankful for our church and the people we call our church family.  They support; help; care; love and encourage all, from the very young to the very old.  I am blessed by having everyone of them in my life.

So, now I have completed my three days of sharing three things I am thankful for, I nominate:  Marie France Lacasse, Patty Kemmers-Geddes and Shannon Curran to share three things – for three days – for which they are grateful.

You can do it!IMG_4354

Patricia

BE BOLDER GROWIN’ OLDER, by BRUCE LEITER – Book Review

How do you spend your time as you have grown older? I took a good look at myself through this book, as I own up to being a senior.

Do we give of our time and money, to assist others, or do we sit back, grumpily complaining about our situation saying, “let someone else do that.  I’ve done my bit?”  Or, do we embrace every moment with thanksgiving?

We need to realize that if we are guilty of the former comment we are effectively stepping out of life; waiting for the grave.

Old does not mean dead. Aging doesn’t give us permission to be mean or bitter.

Let Bruce Leiter’s treasure chest of suggestions allow you to become bolder, while remaining gracious. Change your mental direction and enjoy life, as you too, follow his humorous quips, question periods, and Bible studies. All of which are presented in easy-to-understand format and meant to improve our minds and hearts, as well as emotionally strengthen us, if we choose to open the pages and read it.

I found this book, not only, entertaining but also educational, once I accepted the suggestions for leading a more contented life. We sometimes, fail to recognize that we are dropping out of life, bit by bit, as tiredness, or ill-health takes over. But, we can change that by reading how to overcome the temptations of old age.

I received a copy of this book free of charge, in exchange for an honest review from http://www.bookcrash.com

 Patricia

Frigid Weather

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We are still in the grips of frigid weather.  The temperature is minus 20 degrees celsius, outside.

Thank the Lord, we have not been affected by power cuts, and we do have heat.

I look out the window and am in awe of the spectacular scenes I see.  The trees are clothed in ice; this in turn looks more like crystal as the sun touches them.

feel for all who are suffering because of the cold and darkness, and hope power is restored quickly.  We can pray for them and help whenever, and however we can.

The pictures here demonstrate the ice beauty, they do not convey the trauma of downed trees and power lines, devastating many neighborhoods in Southern Ontario.

Stay safe everyone.

Stay warm.

Seek the comfort of warming centres.

Reach out for any help that is available in your area.

This is no time to be proud and independent.

This cold weather is a life taker.

There is an extreme cold alert in place and it can KILL quickly.

Please be sensible.

Patricia 

https://patriciaeday.wordpress.com for my blog and details of my book.

 

 

Brooding Mood

After the Storm0010

 

The skies are grey and heavy-looking this morning.  Simultaneously, my mood drops to somber.

I could be thinking of dear neighbors who are dealing with the pending and unexpected loss of a dearly loved father.  Additionally, the mother (his wife – who is disabled), has been diagnosed with aggressive dementia and needs 24/7 care.  She barely knows what is happening around her.  When her husband dies she will need admission to a nursing home.  The family cannot look after her.  So, for them all, it’s a waiting game (not that I mean to make light of their burden).  The home will be sold.  A new life will begin for them all.

Me?  I’ll just have to get used to new neighbors.

What’s your mood today?  Hope it is bright and sunny!

Uh-oh:  the sun has broken through the clouds.   Lots to do.  Bye for now.

Patricia